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Gestation Calculator

This calculator has been designed to give you an idea of the treatment options available to you*. If you decide to have an abortion with Marie Stopes UK, one of our nurses will give a more approximate gestation date during your appointment by way of a scan.
*Please note that this online calculator will only give you an estimated gestation based on the details you have provided.

Please select the first day of your last menstrual period.

 

 

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I've had a problem with my contraceptive patch

Find out what to do if your patch has dropped off or you've forgotten to change it.

My patch has dropped off

The patch is very sticky and should stay on. It should not come off in the shower, bath, hot tub or sauna, or during swimming or exercise. However, if it does come off, what you need to do will depend on how long it has been off.

 

If the patch has been off for less than 48 hours:

  • Reapply it as quickly as possible if it is still sticky.
  • If it is not sticky it may not work so apply a new patch. Do not use a plaster or bandage to hold the old patch in place.
  • You don’t need to use any additional contraception and you are still protected against pregnancy.
  • Continue to use your patch as normal, changing it on your normal change day.

 

If the patch has been off for 48 hours or longer or you are unsure how long:

  • Start a whole new patch cycle by applying a new patch as soon as possible. This is now week one of the patch cycle and you will now have a new day of the week as your start day and change day.
  • Use another method of contraception for the next seven days.
  • Ask your doctor or nurse for advice if you have had sex in the previous few days and didn't use a condom as you may need emergency contraception.

I've forgotton to take my patch off

If the patch has been on for less than 48 hours:

Take off the old patch and put on a new one.

  • Continue to use your patch as normal, changing it on your normal change day.
  • You don’t need to use any additional contraception and you are protected against pregnancy.

If the patch has been on for 48 hours or more:

  • Start a whole new patch cycle by applying a new patch as soon as possible. This is now week one of the patch cycle and you will now have a new day of the week as your start day and change day.
  • Use another method of contraception for the next seven days.
  • Ask your doctor or nurse for advice if you've had sex in the previous few days and didn't use a confom as you may need emergency contraception.

 

If you forget to take a patch off at the end of week three, take the patch off as soon as you remember, have a patch-free break and start with a new patch on your usual start day even if you are bleeding. This means that you have a fewer number of patch-free days than usual. You will be protected against pregnancy and do not need to use any additional contraception. You may or may not bleed on the patch-free days.

 

If you forget to put a new patch on at the end of the patch free week, be aware that this is the most risky time to forget to put on a patch. Put on a new patch as soon as you remember. This is now the beginning of your new patch cycle. You will now have a new day of the week as your start day and change day.

 

If you put on the new patch 48 hours or more after your usual start day then you may not be protected from pregnancy. Use an additional method of contraception, such as condoms, for the next seven days. If you had sex in the previous few days and were not using a condom ask your doctor or nurse for advice as you may need emergency contraception.

 

Emergency contraception comes in two forms, the intra-uterine device or IUD, or the so-called 'morning after pill'.

  

Please note that as well as pregnancy, unprotected sex puts you at risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) such as chlamydia. You should visit your local genito-urinary medicine clinic (GUM clinic) or Marie Stopes Central London STI clinic for testing.